8 Comments
Jan 17Liked by Lydia Morrow

oh my goodness I'm finally just reading this and I DON'T KNOW HOW I relate to everything you write on such a deep level. Also the way you write is so good for my lil ND brain!! So engaging, so much like actual speech, just a wonderful experience start to finish. <3

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Jan 6Liked by Lydia Morrow

such a great reading, loved this 😇

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You've made my put Jane Eyre on my reading list - I read it as a teen almost 40 years ago but can remember nothing except the ending (which I won't say for Kaci-in-the-comments and others in case it wrecks their experience).

Your Can-do cardigan looks fabulous, by the way.

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Jan 4Liked by Lydia Morrow

ok, so you've convinced me to read Jane Eyre! I was also a hyperlexic kid, but somehow missed it when I made a pass through the classics.

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Hi hi yes to all of it — the last time I read Jane Eyre (maybe about 10 years ago? After loving it as a child obvi) I was EXTREMELY turned off to the point of grief at how verbally and emotionally abusive I found Rochester to be to Jane. As a kid I thought it was intellectual banter, but then as a young adult I was like “oh no, he’s just mean to her in a different way.” But I have not read it since beginning to think deeply about neurodivergence so I never applied that lens, and now I’m wondering if there is a take here on how sweet intense neurodivergent people are such targets for abusive systems?? See: pattern of folks leaving a church/cult only to often fall into other places where people take advantage of you?? I think this could be such an interesting riff on the more classic analysis of Jane Eyre as [one of?] the first bildungsroman and/or novel characters with self-determination and interior life…..like yes she has such strong characterization, but also she’s like a glowing target for everyone looking to exercise control over her? 🥹 plz hit me up if you’d like to coauthor this paper tysm

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